Medical Construction & Design

JUL-AUG 2017

Medical Construction & Design (MCD) is the industry's leading source for news and information and reaches all disciplines involved in the healthcare construction and design process.

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To maintain the client's target date for medical care, construction was further phased to turn over critical portions of the facility before buildings were fully complete. The team turned over the main computer room in the diagnostic and treatment building 10 months before the remainder of the building to allow VA medical center personnel to expedite the installation and activation of much of the campus' technolog y infrastructure. Construction collaboration Maximizing opportunities for small, local, disadvantaged, minority-owned and veteran-owned businesses was a priority throughout construction. The team's phased approach allowed subcontracting packages to be divided into smaller scopes that were more manageable for small fi rms. A typical project of this size would have 70-90 subcontractors; this eff ort had nearly three times as many. More than $230 million of contracts were awarded to small businesses. The contracting team further increased opportunity for local businesses by hosting two, six-part training sessions to help educate small businesses on federal contracting and construction best practices. Approximately 50 companies completed this Building Blocks program. The construction team also followed up with hands-on training and setting up a mentorship program. The result is that local businesses not only understand procurement, but individual tradesmen have developed a trade in coordination with this job. By linking construction and design strategies with key desired outcomes, such as reduced healthcare-associated infections, fewer falls, increased energ y savings, better patient satisfaction and increased market share, the discussion at the table is no longer about the fi rst costs of healthcare facility design or about meeting immediate facility space needs, but about the role of the physical environment in supporting the mission of the organization in providing high- quality care. This is a positive trend that will aff ect the quality of healthcare facilities being built in the years to come. Barbara Wagner, DBIA, LEED AP, is senior vice president with Clark Construction Group, based in Irvine, California. She can be reached at barbara. wagner@clarkconstruction.com. Above: Sand, Army greens and gray colors that can create anxiety for veterans are avoided in the hospital's design. Instead, softer colors are used to promote calm and relaxation. Maximizing opportunities for small, local, disadvantaged, minority- owned and veteran- owned businesses was a priority throughout construction. The team's phased approach allowed subcontracting packages to be divided into smaller scopes that were more manageable for small fi rms. 42 Medical Construction & Design | J U LY/AUGUST 2017 | MCDM AG.COM

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