Medical Construction & Design

JUL-AUG 2018

Medical Construction & Design (MCD) is the industry's leading source for news and information and reaches all disciplines involved in the healthcare construction and design process.

Issue link: https://mcdmag.epubxp.com/i/1002425

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 34 of 70

30 Medical Construction & Design | J U LY/AUGUST 2018 | MCDM AG.COM Ventilation is an eff ective start to pre- venting HAIs, as this design element can be implemented before disease transmis- sion starts to occur in a hospital. With good air ventilation systems as the founda- tion of the risk-reduction hierarchy, health systems can layer on additional safety measures, such as eff ective hand-washing and environmental services. It's on the surface Three major trends are pushing design- ers to innovate and re-think patient room layouts and surface accessibility for easier cleaning. First, more clinical services are being delivered by physicians, nurses and specialists to patients in their rooms, rather than by transporting patients around the healthcare facility. This re- duces corridor and system congestion, as well as potential hazards related to patient transfers. Second, there's a growing demand for acuity-adaptable rooms constructed to accommodate the needs of patients as they gradually recover. AARs reduce operating costs, increase patient safety and decrease medical errors by reducing transfers. With both trends, we can expect to see more healthcare workers and hospital staff providing services within patient rooms, so designers must plan accordingly. Lastly, as the obesity crisis in the United States and many other countries continues to worsen, rooms will have to accommodate larger beds for bariatric patients and larger furnishings for visitors. This trend also makes it more complex and time consuming for environmen- tal services to properly disinfect all surfaces. Terminal room disinfection (disin- fection of a room between occupying patients) plays a vital role in limiting the transfer of multidrug-resistant or- ganisms and other nosocomial patho- gens. But the success of terminal room disinfection also depends on human factors, such as training and manage- ment of personnel, as well as accessi- bility to room surfaces. Combined with the trends causing patients in acute- care settings to be in their rooms for longer durations and more frequently, this trend limits the ES team's cleaning eff ectiveness. Designers must also take into consideration the confl icting needs of stakeholders, as nurses and physicians want more work space to monitor and treat patients at the bedside, while the ES team's workload increases due to the addi- tional surfaces HAIs can accrue. Designers must balance the sometimes confl icting needs of patient comfort, clinician work Terminal room disinfection (disinfection of a room between occupying patients) plays a vital role in limiting the transfer of multidrug-resistant organisms and other nosocomial pathogens. Right: More clinical services are being delivered by physicians, nurses and specialists to patients in their rooms, rather than by transporting patients around the healthcare facility. Infection Control ISSUE FOCUS Clearances around the bedside optimize headwall and room cleaning.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Medical Construction & Design - JUL-AUG 2018